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The Names Who Served


Record a family vet today. Own history and profit tomorrow...

The first phonograph recording device was patented in 1857, four years before the Civil War... and perfected and commercialized in 1877, well within the lifetime of Civil War veterans. But how many American families own a voice recording of a Civil War veteran family member?

World War II veterans are dying at a rate of 1,012 per day, according to the Veterans Administration. Vietnam War veterans, due to chemical exposure and lack of proper medical care, are dying at approximately the same rate. Within the next decade there will be few, if any, WWII vets alive... and there will be few, if any, American families who will own a voice recording of their WWII veteran speaking about one or more of his or her wartime experiences.

American military families need to make time to collect voice recordings of their aging and dying military family members... if not for posterity, for profit. The estimated auction value of a Civil War recording of a Civil War vet describing the battle of Gettysburg is incalculable. The sale of copies of such a recording could range in the tens of millions of dollars.

American families can preserve family and American history by pushing a microphone, or videocam, before their war veteran. TV documentaries are edited to tell an edited story, but personal recording tell the full story from the participant's own mouth.

Record a family vet today. Own history and profit tomorrow...


This Website Established 29 November 2008